Parents should develop school severe allergy plan

Friday, November 10, 2017 04:05PM
Dr. Ashton talks about food allergies following the death of a boy who was fed a grilled cheese sandwich at pre-K.


NEW YORK - The death of a 3-year-old child with a severe dairy allergy in Harlem is raising concerns for some parents of children with serious food allergies.

Elijah Silvera suffered a severe allergic reaction at his school, the Seventh Avenue Center for Family Services, last Friday after eating a grilled cheese sandwich. He was rushed to Harlem Hospital, where he died.

For parents managing their child's allergies, planning is critical.

ABC News Medical Correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton tells Eyewitness News every parent should review a plan with school officials.

"Have an emergency plan and go through that plan, not just once, but practically every trimester, every semester, every time children are in a new school," Dr. Ashton said.

Parents should also practice using an epinephrine auto-injector, because it's a safe and life-saving device.

"Epinephrine is an incredibly safe medication, and you want to air on the side of caution," Dr. Ashton said. "It's better to use that epinephrine than not to use it."

The bottom line is it's better to have auto-injectors accessible at all times, if your child suffers from a severe food allergy.
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