Health officials: Tourist infected with measles visited Met, attractions in Manhattan, Brooklyn, upstate

Sunday, February 25, 2018 03:31PM
Naveen Dhaliwal reports on the warning of potential measles exposure.

ALBANY, New York - An Australian tourist, who is confirmed to have measles, visited several locations throughout New York, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Health officials are warning that the illness was potentially exposed to others in the area.

The infected tourist visited the Met, along with hotels, education centers, and more throughout Brooklyn, Manhattan, as well as Putnam and Orange counties.

The New York State Department of Health announced Friday that anyone who visited the following locations in Manhattan and Brooklyn may have been exposed:

-- La Quinta Inn, 31 W. 71st Street, New York, NY, between February 16 and the morning of February 19, 2018.

-- Oasis Bible Tours at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 5th Avenue, New York, NY, the morning of February 16, and the evening of February 17, 2018.

-- Watchtower Educational Center, 100 Watchtower Drive, Patterson, NY, between 12:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. on February 19, 2018.

-- Best Western Hotel, 1324 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, NY, from February 19 until 12:00 p.m. on February 20, 2018.

-- Comfort Inn & Suites Goshen - Middletown, 20 Hatfield Lane, Goshen, NY, from 4:30 p.m. on February 20 until 10:30 a.m. on February 21, 2018.

-- Excel Urgent Care, 1 Hatfield Lane, Goshen, NY, between 8:00 a.m. - 11:30 a.m. on February 21, 2018.

-- Orange Regional Medical Center, Emergency Department, 707 E. Main Street, Middletown, NY, between 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. on February 21, 2018.

Health officials: Tourist infected with measles visited Met, attractions in Manhattan, Brooklyn, upstate

Measles symptoms include runny nose, rash, cough, fever or eye inflammation, officials said.

Doctors say it can take up to ten days to recover from the highly contagious illness.

"You're contagious at the point about a week after your symptoms begin," said Dr. Robert Glatter of Lenox Hill Hospital. "It's possible it can be transmitted to others who just breathe the air or if they touch their face or nose or mouth, if they touched a surface prior with the virus."

The health department advises those who are unsure if they have been vaccinated or not to contact their health care providers before going for treatment.

You can learn more about measles on the Centers for Disease Control's website.

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