7 On Your Side warning: 3 new sneaky scams

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Nina Pineda uncovers howscammers are stealing thousands.

It's the Trifecta, a trio of swindles with a purse bigger than the recent Triple Crown winner! Authorities say thousands of victims are falling for these three new scams left and right.

"What you should do is hang up!" That's former New Jersey Consumer Affairs Commissioner Adam Levin's advice for anyone getting a call from someone phishing for info.

Levin now runs www.Cyberscout.com a cyber security firm which says that trending now is Medicare fraud.

Millions of Americans are waiting for new Medicare cards, which no longer use Social Security numbers as ID.

"The fact that they get a phone call from somebody representing themselves to be from Medicare seems logical. Unfortunately the illogical part is when they ask you to supply Social Security information or financial information," says Levin.

He reminds that Medicare officials will never call you to update information. Your card will be sent with instructions via the US mail.

Next, Western Union refunds. If you were a victim of a scam and used Western Union's money transfer system, you were able to file a claim to get your money back before May 31st.

The deadline has passed but scammers are still taking advantage of Western Union restitution by sending out phony emails pretending to need to verify refunds.

"Basically Social Security information and financial information. You do not want to do this," warns Levin.

The third new scam targets people via Chinese language phone calls. Phone scammers purporting to be from a shipper or Chinese consulate office are tricking people in the US into handing over huge sums of money.

It is a robocall. If you follow the prompts in the robocall because you're nervous, they will explain you have been part of a parcel scam and received an illegal parcel.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) said that people across the country have been reporting the calls, deploying a range of fear tactics in a bid to scare the recipient involving a package.

At some point, the caller will ask for a fee to receive the box or personal details such as bank or credit card information to avoid being in trouble.

"The supreme rule, never authenticate yourself to anyone who contacts you for any reason," said Levin.

The Big Takeaway, never click on emailed links. Never give your name, date of birth or Social Security over the phone, text or email and never wire money to strangers pretending to have a prize or package for you in return.

For more information on these scams, visit:

FTC Western Union Alert

Reporting Medicare Scams


Chinese Consulate impersonator scam


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