WORLD SCIENCE FESTIVAL 2015 - Coming May 27th!

NEW YORK -- The country's foremost science festival brings the drama of discovery to all! Find out about the wide range of programs to be had at the World Science Festival. Below is a press release, with the full slate of program information from its organizers.

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2015 World Science Festival Comprises More Than 50 Events Including:

* Light Falls, a New Original Work Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity, Featuring Festival Co-Founder Brian Greene and Created with Composer Jeff Beal ("House of Cards") and the 2015 Tony-Nominated Team from 59 Productions (An American in Paris)

* Opportunities to Hear and Engage with Numerous World-Renowned Scientists, Including NASA Chief Scientist Ellen Stofan, Paleoanthropologist Lee Berger, Nobel-Winning Theoretical Physicist Steven Weinberg, Nobel-Winning Astrophysicist Adam Riess, and Physicist and String Theorist Edward Witten, Who Will Deliver the Festival's Signature "On the Shoulders of Giants" Lecture

* Free Outdoor Activities Including a Massive Sculptural Installation from NASA Exploring Satellites, a Catch-and-Release Fish Count in the Waters Surrounding NYC, Scientific Sails Through New York Harbor, Stargazing (with Music) in Brooklyn Bridge Park, and a Science Street Fair in Washington Square Park

* Science and Story Events Featuring Award-Winning Authors Diane Ackerman (The Human Age), Dan Fagin (Toms River), Steven Pinker (The Language Instinct), David Quammen (The Chimp and the River), Rebecca Skloot (The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks) and Neal Stephenson (Seveneves)

* Alan Alda's Flame Challenge, on the Question "What Is Sleep?"

* Provocative Talks, Salons and Demonstrations of New Developments in Cognitive Enhancement, Cyber Security, Artificial Intelligence, Dark Energy, Black Holes, Quantum Mechanics, Free Will, and Other Areas, Featuring the Topics' Foremost Thinkers

* Apprentice Programs Where 3rd-10th Grade Students Will Learn Directly from Top Scientists in Astronomy, Neuroeconomics, Biochemistry, Nanochemistry, Aquatic Science, Genetics, Dog Behavior, and Other Fields

* Who Run the Lab?, an Event to Propel High School Girls into the Next Generation of Women Scientists

* World Science U for a Day: Evolution of Mind and Matter, a Live Event from the World Science Festival's Innovative Online Education Initiative

* A Program Showcasing the Coolest Jobs in Science, Hosted by Science Bob ("Jimmy Kimmel Live")

* Astronauts Including Nicole Stott and Michael Lpez-Alegra

* Scientific Kitchen Events Including Botany at the Bar, a Workshop with the Botanists Behind Shoots & Roots Bitters and Estela; and We All Scream for (Stretchy?!) Ice Cream, Featuring Chemist Kent Kirshenbaum and Former White House Pastry Chef Bill Yosses

The World Science Festival is pleased to announce the programming lineup for its 2015 edition, which will engage audiences of all ages in the drama of scientific discovery over the course of five days (May 27 - 31) and through more than 50 events presented in performing arts centers, museums, parks, plazas, rivers, lecture halls, laboratories, and other locations spanning-and outside of-New York City's five boroughs. The Festival will bring the City into direct contact with many of the world's leading scientists, thinkers, and artists through original programs that are by turns intellectually stimulating, entertaining and fun. Tickets are available now at worldsciencefestival.com. Please find descriptions of each day's events below.

When the World Science Festival first launched in 2008, it represented a significant leap of faith for its founders, the highly regarded physicist and string theorist Brian Greene and four-time Emmy-winning journalist Tracy Day. New York City, a place teeming with things to do and unique opportunities for enrichment, had no festival introducing the general public to the great minds and wonders of science. The World Science Festival is now an anticipated annual attraction that consistently draws capacity crowds to events including performances, outdoor installations, interactive demonstrations, talks, debates, and much more.

Brian Greene, Co-Founder of the World Science Festival and Chairman of the Science Festival Foundation, said, "When people realize that there's so much more to science than what's in the textbooks, science comes alive. That's a life-changing experience. And that's what the World Science Festival is all about."

Tracy Day, Co-Founder and CEO of the World Science Festival remarked, "By recasting science with art, music and story, we're shifting science toward the center of culture. We're touching all those people who love the arts but run the other way, and fast, when it comes to science."

2015 WORLD SCIENCE FESTIVAL PROGRAMMING
Many events will be streamed live at http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/livestreams

WEDNESDAY, MAY 27

Who Run the Lab?
Participants: Chiye Aoki, Shara Bailey, Jasna Brujic, Jane Carlton, Lara Mahal, Wendy Suzuki, Christine Vogel, Alexandra Zidovska
May 27, 9:45am - 2:45pm
NYU Silver Center Lobby (31 Washington Place)
FREE; by invitation only

In this event, which takes a cue from Beyonc's "Who Run the World? Girls," NYU lab directors from astronomy, anthropology, neural science, and more will open their doors to high school girls from around New York City in an effort to inspire the next generation of women scientists. Students will have the rare opportunity to experience firsthand the work of these prominent scientists and learn about the paths that brought them to their rewarding careers. Participants will tour four separate labs (20 minutes each), with a break in the middle of the day for lunch with NYU neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. This program is produced in collaboration with The College of Arts and Science at New York University (NYU) and the Women in Science program (WINS). Attendance, while free, is by invitation only.

The NASA Orbit Pavilion
May 27-29, 10am-5 pm; May 30, noon-4pm; May 31 10am-6pm
Gould Plaza, NYU (40 W. 4th Street)
FREE
Enter the "NASA Orbit Pavilion," a massive, interactive sculpture premiering at the World Science Festival. Learn about Earth Science satellites that monitor our planet's ever-changing pulse from their unique vantage points. Listen to sounds of the satellites in real time, view our planet through the 3-D programs, and conduct hands-on activities with NASA scientists. Created by NASA in collaboration with STUDIOKCA and Shane Myrbeck.

Space Exploration: Reaching New Heights
May 27-29, 10am-5pm, May 30, 10am-6pm
Pier 86 next to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum (West 46 Street and 12th Avenue)
FREE
Ever wonder how rockets launch or spacecraft land when coming back from space? Curious about the technology that gives us those spectacular images of other planets and distant stars? Join NASA scientists and educators at the World Science Festival for answers with hands-on activities. Experiment with infrared cameras, make seltzer rockets, see models of the James Webb Space Telescope. And learn about future explorations to Mars and other parts of the solar system and the advancements in flight and technology that will help us explore space.

Light Falls: Space, Time and an Obsession of Einstein
Participants: Brian Greene, Jessica Frey, Carl Howell
May 27 at 8pm
Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College (524 W. 59th Street)
SOLD OUT
The World Science Festival will present a preview performance of a new evening-length multimedia work celebrating the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein's discovery of the General Theory of Relativity. In Light Falls, physicist and Festival co-founder Brian Greene and an ensemble cast including Jessica Frey and Carl Howell, guide a broad audience to experience the breakthrough moments, the near misses, the agonizing frustrations and the final emergence into the light, as a single intrepid mind took on the grandest mystery of the cosmos-and won. Weaving together live action with state-of-the-art animation and projection methods, the work provides an edge-of-your-seat retelling of the dramatic journey that resulted in one of the deepest scientific insights of all time. Directed by by Scott Faris. Light Falls is designed by 59 Productions (An American in Paris, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, the David Bowie Is series, Philip Glass' The Perfect American) and features original music by Jeff Beal ("House of Cards").

Spark of Genius? Electrical Stimulation and the Brain
Participants: Nita A. Farahany, Richard Haier, Michael Weisend
Moderator: Richard Besser
May 27 at 8pm
NYU Skirball Center (566 LaGuardia Place)
$35 ($20 for students)
How far would you go to improve your memory, sharpen your focus, or improve your learning ability? Would you be willing to strap on headgear that delivers electrical shocks to targeted areas of your brain? You may soon have that option. It's called transcranial direct current stimulation, and it's already known to help some stroke and depression patients. Soldiers, gamers, students, and others looking for a cognitive edge are also using variations of the technique. Does it work? Can carefully directed electrical stimulation improve cognitive function? What are potential long-term effects? And how should it be regulated?
This discussion on the topic will feature noted neuroscientist Michael Weisend; Nita A. Farahany, a leading scholar on the ethical, legal, and social implications of biosciences and emerging technologies; and psychologist Richard Haier. Richard Besser will moderate.

THURSDAY, MAY 28
The NASA Orbit Pavilion
May 27-29, 10am-5 pm; May 30, noon-4pm; May 31 10am-6pm
Gould Plaza, NYU (40 W. 4th Street)
FREE
Enter the "NASA Orbit Pavilion," a massive, interactive sculpture premiering at the World Science Festival. Learn about Earth Science satellites that monitor our planet's ever-changing pulse from their unique vantage points. Listen to sounds of the satellites in real time, view our planet through the 3-D programs, and conduct hands-on activities with NASA scientists. Created by NASA in collaboration with STUDIOKCA and Shane Myrbeck.

Space Exploration: Reaching New Heights
May 27-29, 10am-5pm, May 30, 10am-6pm
Pier 86 next to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum (West 46 Street and 12th Avenue)
FREE
Ever wonder how rockets launch or spacecraft land when coming back from space? Curious about the technology that gives us those spectacular images of other planets and distant stars? Join NASA scientists and educators at the World Science Festival for answers with hands-on activities. Experiment with infrared cameras, make seltzer rockets, see models of the James Webb Space Telescope. And learn about future explorations to Mars and other parts of the solar system and the advancements in flight and technology that will help us explore space.

Pioneers in Science: Ellen Stofan
Moderator: Bill Ritter
May 28 at 10am
Streamed live at www.worldsciencefestival.com/pioneers
FREE
The World Science Festival's Pioneers in Science program offers high school students a path toward greatness through a rare opportunity to interact with a wide range of world-renowned scientists. This year, students from around the globe will engage with Ellen Stofan, NASA's Chief Scientist and a leading planetary geologist. During this intimate gathering, students will have the opportunity to ask Stofan about her career, her inspirations, and NASA's science programs. This event is open to the general public for viewing at www.worldsciencefestival.com/pioneers; in-person attendance is by invitation only.

SALON: Electric Medicine and the Brain
Participants: Richard Haier, Alayar Kangarlu, Leah Moran, Tarique Perera, Michael Weisend
May 28, 5-6:30pm
NYU Global Center, Grand Hall (238 Thompson Street, 5th Floor)
$25 ($15 for students)
The World Science Festival's annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival's premier public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and well-informed members of the general public.
Does electrical stimulation to the brain hold the key to better treatment for depression, stroke, and other neurological problems? Join us for an in-depth look at the use of TMS (magnetic) and tDCS (electrical) devices. We'll hear from a psychiatrist and the depression patient he has treated with electric stimulation, as well as from neuroscientists who will discuss and demonstrate the use of these devices and what their research is telling them about the potential for treatment. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

Science and Story: Nature's Dramas
Participants: Diane Ackerman, Dan Fagin, David Quammen, Rebecca Skloot, Neal Stephenson
Moderator: John Hockenberry
May 28 at 7pm
Kaye Playhouse at Hunter College (E. 68th Street between Park & Lexington Avenues)
$30 ($15 for students)
Is there a greater dramatist than Mother Nature? From diseases and disasters to the miracles wrought by evolution, the environmental forces that shape our lives are the inspiration for countless science writers. This event, part of the Festival's Science and Story series, will feature award-winning authors Diane Ackerman (The Human Age), Dan Fagin (Toms River), David Quammen (The Chimp and the River), Rebecca Skloot (The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks), and Neal Stephenson (Seveneves), whose bestselling books explore the complicated interplay of science, ethics, history, and social responsibility. John Hockenberry will moderate.

The Stanford Prison Experiment: Why Ordinary People Do Terrible Things
Participants: Kyle Patrick Alvarez, Christina Maslach, Michael Stone
Moderator: Jeffrey Toobin
May 28, 7-10pm
Redstone Theater, Museum of the Moving Image (36-01 35th Avenue, Queens)
SOLD OUT
In a notorious experiment to investigate the psychology of imprisonment, Dr. Philip Zimbardo created a mock penitentiary in which student volunteers were randomly assigned to be either guard or prisoner. The film, The Stanford Prison Experiment, is a dramatic re-creation of the study's shocking turn of events. The participants rapidly descend into their assigned roles, with guards becoming cruel and sadistic and prisoners rebelling or sinking into despair. Zimbardo (Billy Crudup) and his team monitor the escalation of action, not realizing that they too have shed their identities and been absorbed into the experiment. After the screening, we'll explore the film's central question, a refrain echoing from Auschwitz to Abu Ghraib to ISIS: What insight does science provide regarding why some of us become capable of extraordinary cruelty? This program is supported by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation as part of its Public Understanding of Science and Technology Initiative.

The Moth: It's All Relative
Participants: Mindy Greenstein, Mand Holford, Danielle Ofri, Ellen Stofan
Moderator: Nancy Giles
May 28, 7:30-9pm (Doors open at 6:30 PM.)
The Players (16 Gramercy Park South)
SOLD OUT
In partnership with The Moth, the Peabody Award-winning storytelling collective, we bring esteemed scientists, writers and innovators to the stage to share stories of their personal relationships with science. They're tales of insight, wins and losses, and unexpected twists. In keeping with The Moth's tradition, the rules are simple: all stories are told within ten minutes, and without notes. The results are sometimes funny, sometimes poignant, and always entertaining.

The New Right Stuff
Participants: Jennifer Fogarty, Michael Lpez-Alegra, Jack Stuster
Moderator: Bill Weir May 28, 7:30-9pm
Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum (Pier 86: West 46th Street and 12th Avenue)
$35 ($20 for students)
On May 5, 1961, Alan Shepard piloted America's first manned space flight, Mercury 7. In the decades since, the bold few who followed were chosen only because they possessed the right combination of smarts, grit, and individualism-the right stuff. But now with commercial aerospace companies eying manned missions with private citizens paying their way, the "right stuff" is being radically revised. Besides a healthy bank account, what does it take to be a space tourist? What happens to the human body after weeks or even months living in a Space Hilton? And how should we choose those who will take a one-way journey into history, the first members of our species to live and die on another planet? This program is produced in collaboration with the Intrepid Sea, Air & Space Museum.

Light Falls: Space, Time and an Obsession of Einstein
Participants: Brian Greene, Jessica Frey, Carl Howell
May 28 at 8pm
Gerald W. Lynch Theater at John Jay College (524 W. 59th Street)
$55 ($35 for students)
The World Science Festival will present a preview performance of a new evening-length multimedia work celebrating the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein's discovery of the General Theory of Relativity. In Light Falls, physicist and Festival co-founder Brian Greene and an ensemble cast including Jessica Frey and Carl Howell, guide a broad audience to experience the breakthrough moments, the near misses, the agonizing frustrations and the final emergence into the light, as a single intrepid mind took on the grandest mystery of the cosmos-and won. Weaving together live action with state-of-the-art animation and projection methods, the work provides an edge-of-your-seat retelling of the dramatic journey that resulted in one of the deepest scientific insights of all time. Directed by by Scott Faris. Light Falls is designed by 59 Productions (An American in Paris, Hedwig and the Angry Inch, the David Bowie Is series, Philip Glass' The Perfect American) and features original music by Jeff Beal ("House of Cards").

To Infinity and Beyond: The Accelerating Universe
Participants: Joshua Frieman, Priyamvada Natarajan, Adam Riess, Jan Tauber, Neil Turok
Moderator: Lawrence Krauss
Thursday, May 28, 8-9:30pm
NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts (566 LaGuardia Place)
$35 ($20 for students)
It's modern cosmology's biggest mystery-an unexplained energy that could one day rip the universe apart. It's called dark energy, an anti-gravitational force that confounds the conventional laws of physics. It's the most dominant substance in the universe, making up more than two-thirds of the cosmos. And yet, nearly two decades after its discovery, science is still grappling to explain what dark energy actually is. With today's top physicists as our guides, we'll journey to the earliest moments of the universe-and then far into the future-searching for answers. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

FRIDAY, MAY 29
The NASA Orbit Pavilion

May 27-29, 10am-5 pm; May 30, noon-4pm; May 31 10am-6pm
Gould Plaza, NYU (40 W. 4th Street)
FREE
Enter the "NASA Orbit Pavilion," a massive, interactive sculpture premiering at the World Science Festival. Learn about Earth Science satellites that monitor our planet's ever-changing pulse from their unique vantage points. Listen to sounds of the satellites in real time, view our planet through the 3-D programs, and conduct hands-on activities with NASA scientists. Created by NASA in collaboration with STUDIOKCA and Shane Myrbeck.

Space Exploration: Reaching New Heights
May 27-29, 10am-5pm, May 30, 10am-6pm
Pier 86 next to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum (West 46 Street and 12th Avenue)
FREE
Ever wonder how rockets launch or spacecraft land when coming back from space? Curious about the technology that gives us those spectacular images of other planets and distant stars? Join NASA scientists and educators at the World Science Festival for answers with hands-on activities. Experiment with infrared cameras, make seltzer rockets, see models of the James Webb Space Telescope. And learn about future explorations to Mars and other parts of the solar system and the advancements in flight and technology that will help us explore space.

Pioneers in Science: Lee Berger
May 29 at 10am
Streamed live at www.worldsciencefestival.com/pioneers
FREE
Students will engage with Lee Berger, one of the world's top paleoanthropologists. Professor Berger discovered an ancient skull in the Rising Star Cave in South Africa, and since then, more than 1,200 more fossils have been unearthed and contributed to our understanding of human evolution. During this intimate gathering, students will have the opportunity to ask Professor Berger about his career, inspirations, and what he hopes to discover next. This event is open to the general public for viewing at www.worldsciencefestival.com/pioneers; in-person attendance is by invitation only.

SALON: Dark Energy: Measuring A Mystery
Participants: Joshua Frieman, Priyamvada Natarajan, Adam Riess
Moderator: Mario Livio
May 29, 5:30pm-7pm
NYU Global Center, Grand Hall (238 Thompson Street, 5th Floor)
$25 ($15 for students)
The World Science Festival's annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival's premier public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and well-informed members of the general public.
Dark energy may be the most compelling problem in modern cosmology. An unexplained substance, it's believed to be the driving force behind cosmic acceleration. And yet there is no consensus on what dark energy actually is. The answer could have profound implications for our understanding of the fundamental laws of physics. This discussion focuses on three cutting-edge studies of dark energy, each using radically different techniques. Adam Riess, winner of the 2011 Nobel Prize for the discovery of dark energy, will share a new technique to more accurately measure the expansion rate of the universe. Priya Natarajan of Yale will explain how dark matter can be used to explore dark energy. And Dark Energy Survey director Joshua Frieman will deliver the very latest from his five-year study. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

Trivia Night at the Museum
Moderator: Faith Salie
May 29, 6-9pm
Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, American Museum of Natural History (200 Central Park West)
$45
Join us for a night of trivia and fun under the blue whale at the American Museum of Natural History. Come with your own team or join up with others and test your science trivia knowledge in a pub-style game that uses the new exhibit "Life at the Limits" as its inspiration. No clue? No problem-if you manage to win a lifeline to one of the scientists we're placing strategically around the room. There'll be prizes for the winners, including tickets for a sleepover at the museum. Your ticket to the event entitles you to one complimentary drink and access to the "Life at the Limits" exhibit one hour prior to the beginning of the game, which begins at 7pm. This program is produced in collaboration with the American Museum of Natural History.

Planet of the Humans: The Leap to the Top
Participants: Lee Berger, Paul Bingham, Dean Falk, Steven Pinker
Moderator: Brian Lehrer
May 29, 8-9pm
NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts (566 LaGuardia Place)
$35 ($20 for students)
For all that Darwin contributed to our understanding of the biological world, he was haunted by one vexing question: How does the incremental process of evolution suddenly produce, say, humans-animals who walk upright, communicate through language, and possess the brainpower to travel to the moon? We are the dominant species in our environment-but did we get here through numerous baby steps or one giant leap? We'll take a multi-disciplinary approach to tackling these questions, calling on some of the world's leading thinkers in anthropology, linguistics, biology, and philosophy. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

SATURDAY, MAY 30

The Great Fish Count
May 30 at various times
13 locations throughout New York City
FREE
The World Science Festival invites New York to pull on waders, cast a net, and see the many types of marine life that can be found in the city's waterways. Maybe one of the participants will be the first to find a seahorse or identify the 222nd species in the Hudson River. From the piers along the West Side Highway and the East River to the tips of Jamaica Bay, NYC's rivers, bays, and estuaries are teeming with life. At 13 sites throughout and beyond the city, festivalgoers will join top ecologists and biologists to catch, count, identify, and release the animals in our waters.

World Science U For a Day: Evolution of Mind and Matter
Participants: Lee Berger, Christof Koch, Alfred Mele, Adam Riess, Dimitar Sasselov
May 30, 9am-5pm, registration 8am
CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, Auditorium (85 St. Nicholas Terrace)
$310
Explore humankind's grandest mysteries, from our accelerating universe to human consciousness, with some of the foremost experts in cosmology, neuroscience, anthropology, philosophy, and more. Immerse yourself in this live program, which offers a curated curriculum for serious enthusiasts who seek stimulating science that goes beyond a popular-level presentation. Price of ticket includes lunch with these scientific masters.

Space Exploration: Reaching New Heights
May 27-29, 10am-5pm, May 30, 10am-6pm
Pier 86 next to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum (West 46 Street and 12th Avenue)
FREE
Ever wonder how rockets launch or spacecraft land when coming back from space? Curious about the technology that gives us those spectacular images of other planets and distant stars? Join NASA scientists and educators at the World Science Festival for answers with hands-on activities. Experiment with infrared cameras, make seltzer rockets, see models of the James Webb Space Telescope. And learn about future explorations to Mars and other parts of the solar system and the advancements in flight and technology that will help us explore space.

Genetic Engineer's Apprentice
Participant: Melissa Lee
May 30, 10-11:30am, 12-1:30pm
Harlem DNA Lab (2351 1st Avenue)
$30
There are good bacteria and bad bacteria, and at the Harlem DNA lab, there are also glow-in-the-dark bacteria. Join biologist Melissa Lee and learn how to take DNA from jellyfish and insert it into bacteria, and voil, glow-in-the-dark bacteria. Then, tour the lab and learn about incubators, centrifuges, and DNA thermal cyclers, which help duplicate DNA. Ages: 7th-8th grade. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Aquatic Scientist's Apprentice
May 30, 10-11:30am
Pier 84's E&E Classroom (West Side Highway and West 44th Street)
Participants: Tina Walsh, Tony Wilson
SOLD OUT
Beneath the surface of New York's Hudson River, an underwater world teems with life. Join Brooklyn College biologist Tony Wilson along the docks of Pier 84, and spot tiny seahorses bobbing among the eelgrass. Learn about larger species living in the Hudson, and get a lesson in fish anatomy as Tony dissects a white perch. Ages: 3rd grade and up. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Dog Behaviorist's Apprentice
Participant: Julie Hecht
May 30, 10-11:30am
NYU Kimmel Center, Lobby (60 Washington Square South, 2nd Floor)
$30
How much do we know about our dogs? When your pooch has done something naughty, is that really a guilty look? What does it mean when a dog rolls over during play? Work side by side with dog behaviorist Julie Hecht to observe dogs in action in Washington Square Park. Take the data you collect and analyze it as a behaviorist does. Ages: 3rd grade and up. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Biochemist's Apprentice
Participant: Mand Holford
May 30, 10:30am-12pm
Hunter College - North Building (695 Park Avenue)
SOLD OUT
There can be a fine line between potentially fatal poisons and lifesaving medicines. Join biochemist Mand Holford as she shows you how to use a microscope to spot tiny venomous critters. You'll also learn how to remove an animal's venom glands and run a chemical analysis to see how to isolate harmful compounds from helpful ones. Ages: 5th-8th grade. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Nanochemist's Apprentice
Participant: Rein Ulijn
May 30, 11-12:30pm
CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, Nanochemistry Lab (85 St. Nicholas Terrace)
SOLD OUT
As any Lego builder will tell you, trying to connect really tiny items can be challenging. In this apprentice program, CUNY nanochemist Rein Ulijn takes you on a journey into the realm of the super small-the nano world. Using a process known as molecular assembly, you'll mix special compounds to create gels like the ones scientists use to deliver medicines or to power electrical circuits. Then, use microscopes to see how these molecular building blocks fit together. Take a tour of this new state-of-the-art lab and learn about nano fabrication tools and powerful electron microscopes. Ages: 6th-8th grade. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Roboticist's Apprentice
Participant: Maurizio Porfiri
Saturday, May 30, 11:30am-1pm
Polytechnic Institute of NYU, MetroTech Plaza (6 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn)
SOLD OUT
What can robots teach us about fish? Plenty, according to NYU Polytech professor Maurizio Porfiri, who engineers robotic animals and will show you how it's done. Using a design program and a 3-D printer, you'll create your own robotic fish. Then tour Professor Porfiri's lab to see how these engineering marvels are used in science experiments with real fish. Ages: 6th-8th grade. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Science and Story Caf
Participants: Alfred Mele, Leonard Mlodinow, Steven Pinker, Catherine Price, Bob Reiss, Laura J. Snyder, Wendy Suzuki
Moderators: Rick Karr, Gary Marcus
May 30, 11-2:30pm NYU Kimmel Center, Commuter Lounge (60 Washington Square S, Room 203)
FREE
Join top science authors for coffee and conversation throughout the day, shop our carefully curated selection of science books (at the NYU pop-up book shop open on Saturday and Sunday 10 AM-6 PM), and have your books signed by participating authors.

The NASA Orbit Pavilion
May 27-29, 10am-5 pm; May 30, noon-4pm; May 31 10am-6pm
Gould Plaza, NYU (40 W. 4th Street)
FREE
Enter the "NASA Orbit Pavilion," a massive, interactive sculpture premiering at the World Science Festival. Learn about Earth Science satellites that monitor our planet's ever-changing pulse from their unique vantage points. Listen to sounds of the satellites in real time, view our planet through the 3-D programs, and conduct hands-on activities with NASA scientists. Created by NASA in collaboration with STUDIOKCA and Shane Myrbeck.

Computer Scientist's Apprentice
Participants: Jake Hofman, Justin M. Rao
May 30, 12:30-2pm
Microsoft Research Lab (641 Avenue of the Americas)
SOLD OUT
Whether they're making the smallest smartphone apps or the biggest search engines, computer scientists need to know more than just how to write code. They need to be able to think like a computer too. You'll be one of the few to visit Microsoft's Research Lab and join researchers Jake Hofman and Justin M. Rao to do just that. Write your own code to predict your opponent's next move in Rock, Paper, Scissors, recognize spam from normal emails and learn how search engines are not really different than auction houses. (No previous coding experience required.) Ages: 9th-10th grades. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Neuroeconomist's Apprentice
Participant: Paul Glimcher
May 30, 1-2:30pm
NYU Neuroeconomics Lab (4 Washington Place, Room 809)
SOLD OUT
Decisions are a big part of daily life. What to eat? Go to bed or stay up late? Homework or video games? Run an experiment with NYU neuroeconomist Paul Glimcher to determine how we arrive at our choices. Predict what risks your peers are willing to take for a potential big reward, and then test them. Visit the brain imaging center and watch a scan of an NYU student's brain. See which parts of the brain light up while making decisions. Ages: 3rd-8th grade. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Museum Scientist's Apprentice
Participant: Marco Leona
May 30, 1-2:30pm
Metropolitan Museum of Art (1000 Fifth Avenue)
SOLD OUT
Scientists are busy working in labs at art museums, and here's your chance to go behind the scenes with one. Join Marco Leona, scientist in charge at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and learn how to make dyes from dead bugs like the Maya and Aztec civilizations did. You'll then use the latest scientific techniques and technologies to identify the same dyes in art that's over 100 years old. Ages: 6th-8th grade. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

On the Shoulders of Giants: Edward Witten
May 30 at 1:30pm
NYU Global Center, Grand Hall (238 Thompson St., 5th Floor)
SOLD OUT
The towering American physicist Edward Witten will deliver this year's signature World Science Festival address, which invites audiences to stand on the shoulders of modern-day scientific giants. Described by colleagues as "the kind of person who comes along once a century," "Einstein's successor," and "the most influential and dominating figure" in physics, Witten has raised the bar across the landscape of physics and mathematics, performing groundbreaking work in particle physics, gravitational physics, topology, string theory, and geometry.

Cool Jobs
Participants: Marah Hardt, Tanya Lowe, Amber Straughn, Steve Wolf
Host: "Science Bob" Pflugfelder
May 30 at 2pm
NYU Skirball Center (566 LaGuardia Place)
$30 ($15 for students)
Scientists hold the coolest jobs on-and off-the planet. Hosted by "Science Bob" Pflugfelder ("Jimmy Kimmel Live"), audience members will not only hear from, but experience first-hand the work of professionals such as Marah Hardt, a marine scientist whose childhood love of the water led her into a career to save our oceans; Steve Wolf, a movie buff whose fascination with blowing things up led him to study science so he could learn to create safe and amazing special effects for film; Amber Straughn, a NASA astrophysicist who studies black holes and distant galaxies; and Tanya Lowe, a wildlife conservationist who will bring along an ocelot and a turkey vulture.

Astronomer's Apprentice
Participant: Allyson Sheffield
May 30, 2:30-4pm
Rutherford Observatory and Classroom (120th Street and Broadway)
SOLD OUT
How do we study space from Earth? Astronomer Allyson Sheffield of LaGuardia College will answer that question with a tour of the Rutherford Observatory. You'll learn how to spot sunspots through the optical telescopes. Then test out a spectrograph and try to determine elements of stars, gas clouds and more. Ages: 4th-8th grade. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Neuroscientist's Apprentice
Participant: Wendy Suzuki
May 30, 3-4:30pm
NYU Kimmel Center, Lobby (60 Washington Square South, 2nd Floor)
$30
How brainy are you about brains? New York University neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki leads students in a (very) up-close exploration of the brain. Dissect a sheep's brain and learn its anatomy and function. You'll learn which parts of your brain control your muscles and your senses. Ages: 3rd grade and up. This event is supported by the Bezos Family Foundation.

Scientific Sails
Under the Sun: with Frank Nitsche, May 30, 3-5pm,
Under the Stars: with Frank Nitsche and Nicole Stott May 30, 7-9pm
Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 5 (Joralemon Street, Brooklyn)
SOLD OUT
Raise the sails, cast off, and join the World Science Festival for one of these stunningly beautiful, deeply informative tours of New York Harbor aboard the schooner Mystic Whaler with geophysicist Frank Nitsche. In the 3pm sail, Nitsche will show how he analyzes the waters surrounding Antarctica, and how those same tools and measurements can be used to gauge the health of the Hudson River.
In the 7pm sail, participants will learn how navigating a ship has evolved, from looking at the sea and stars to relying on today's charts and satellites. Nitsche will demonstrate the modern tools used to figure out where you are in the open sea, and NASA astronaut Nicole Stott will reflect on how exploring the sea is like exploring space.

SALON: Until the End of Time
Participants: Vijay Balasubramanian, Janna Levin, Lee Smolin
Moderator: George Musser
May 30, 3:30-5pm
NYU Global Center, Grand Hall (238 Thompson Street, 5th Floor)
$25 ($15 for students)
The World Science Festival's annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival's premier public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and well-informed members of the general public.
Could time as we know it come to an end? Does the very question blow your mind a little? Come with us to explore this idea by examining the Big Bang and the mysteries of black holes, where, according to the laws of physics, time itself comes to an abrupt halt. And if you're wondering how physical laws operating within time can predict the end of time, join leading physicists and cosmologists for this intriguing conversation. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

Wizards of Odds
Participants: Robert C. Green, Suresh Jagannathan, Leonard Mlodinow, Masoud Mohseni
Moderator: John Hockenberry
May 30, 3-4:30pm
The Gerald W Lynch Theater at John Jay College (524 West 59th Street)
$35 ($20 for students)
Probability is the backbone of science, but how well do you understand it? Odds are, not as well as you think. Probability governs the validity of experimental results, the predictive utility of mathematical models, even the state of atomic matter. Yet, probability is a surprisingly subtle concept that is often misunderstood, sometimes even by professionals who use it to guide crucial and far-reaching decisions. We've gathered some of the world's leading experts from technology, physics, medicine, and programming to explore the slippery side of probability and the powerful role it plays in modern life. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

Scientific Kitchen: We all Scream for (Stretchy?!) Ice Cream
Participants: Kent Kirshenbaum, Bill Yosses
May 30, 3-5pm
NYU Silver Center - Chemistry Lab (31 Washington Place, 7th Floor)
SOLD OUT
How about some ice cream you can eat with a knife and fork? In this laboratory-turned-ice-cream-parlour, NYU chemist Kent Kirshenbaum and former White House pastry chef Bill Yosses will demonstrate (and you'll taste) the Turkish ice cream known as "dondurma." It's an amazingly elastic style of ice cream that uses salep powder, a flour made from an orchid root, and mastic gum, made from tree resin, in addition to milk and sugar. Learn the chemical properties that make it melt-resistant and stretchy. This program is part of the Scientific Kitchen Series-intimate, hands-on workshops behind the scenes and exclusive kitchens and laboratories in New York.

Spotlight: Women in Science
May 30, 5-7pm
NeueHouse (110 East 25th Street)
$40
"To boldly go where no man has gone before" is our theme for an evening of hearing from, and drinking with, some of the brightest and boldest women in science. In this intimate setting these trailblazing scientists share stories about their work, their inspiration, their biggest triumphs and greatest challenges. It's a science-based happy hour honoring women in science (but men are most welcome, too). This event is sponsored by the Mount Sinai Health System.

SALON: Cyber Insecurity
Participants: Artur Ekert, Joseph Lawlor, Koos Lodewijkx, Radu Sion
Moderator: Rick Karr
May 30, 6-7:30pm
NYU Global Center, Grand Hall (238 Thompson Street, 5th Floor)
$25 ($15 for students)
The World Science Festival's annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival's premier public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and well-informed members of the general public.
From banking to the battlefield, we guard our secrets with digitally encrypted messages. Today's encryption systems are based on factoring algorithms-calculations too difficult for classical computers to crack. But a quantum computer would be exponentially faster, leaving even the most secure information vulnerable. Quantum cryptography pioneer Artur Ekert shares the latest efforts to develop unbreakable codes. We'll learn how private industry and the government are fighting cyber crime from experts from the FBI and IBM, and we'll address our personal security and privacy concerns. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

Scientific Kitchen: Botany at the Bar
Participants: Selena Ahmed, Rachel Meyer, Christian Schaal
May 30 at 7pm
NYU Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (12 Waverly Place)
SOLD OUT
The World Science Festival's series of intimate, hands-on, food-meets-science workshops will feature evolutionary biologist Rachel Meyer and botanist Selena Ahmed of Shoots & Roots Bitters with mixologist Christian Schaal of Estela, which "brings the flavor and stories of plants from around the world to your beverage through science-based craft bitters for a remarkable taste of botanical diversity." In this event, the company's founders will discuss and demonstrate their work to promote botany education and biodiversity while creating exciting bitters for your soda water, cocktails, and other drinks.

Night Lights, Big City: Stargazing
May 30 at 7-11pm
Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 1 (Old Fulton and Furman Streets, Brooklyn)
FREE
Bring a telescope (or borrow one from the Festival) for a night of stargazing and live music to celebrate the dance of the planets. Participants will meet astronomers and astronauts, space out to cosmic beats, and look to the stars and imagine the worlds beyond.

Mind Over Masters: The Question of Free Will
Participants: Christof Koch, Tamar Kushnir, Alfred Mele, Azim Shariff
Moderator: Emily Senay
May 30, 8-9:30p
NYU Skirball Center for the Performing Arts (566 LaGuardia Place)
$35 ($20 for students)
Do we make conscious decisions? Or, as many scientists and philosophers argue, are all of our actions predetermined? And if they are predetermined-if we don't have free will-are we responsible for what we do? These are questions that have been debated for centuries but now, neurotechnology is allowing scientists to study brain activity neuron by neuron to try to determine how and when our brains decide to act. With neuroscientists, psychologists, and philosophers we'll use the latest findings to explore the question of just how much agency we have in the world, and how the answer impacts our ethics, our behavior and our society. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

SUNDAY, MAY 31

World Science U for a Day: The Continuing Quest for a Theory of Everything
Participants: Gabriela Gonzlez, Samir Mathur, Carlo Rovelli, Andrew Strominger, Cumrun Vafa
May 31, 9am-5pm, registration 8am
CUNY Advanced Science Research Center, Auditorium (85 St Nicholas Terrace)
$310
Embark on a quest with some of the greatest physicists in the search for a unified theory of everything. Immerse yourself in this live program, offering a curated curriculum for serious enthusiasts who seek stimulating science that goes beyond a popular-level presentation. From string theory to black holes to quantum gravity, this is a full day to challenge your mind and be guided by a dream-team faculty. Price of ticket includes lunch with these scientific masters.

The NASA Orbit Pavilion
May 27-29, 10am-5 pm; May 30, noon-4pm; May 31 10am-6pm
Gould Plaza, NYU (40 W. 4th Street)
FREE
Enter the "NASA Orbit Pavilion," a massive, interactive sculpture premiering at the World Science Festival. Learn about Earth Science satellites that monitor our planet's ever-changing pulse from their unique vantage points. Listen to sounds of the satellites in real time, view our planet through the 3-D programs, and conduct hands-on activities with NASA scientists. Created by NASA in collaboration with STUDIOKCA and Shane Myrbeck.

The Ultimate Science Street Fair
May 31, 10am-6pm
Washington Square Park (1 Washington Square East)
FREE
2015 World Science Festival turns Washington Square Park into an outdoor lab celebrating the fascinating science that shapes our lives. It's a full day of hands-on activities, interactive experiments, installations, and demonstrations. Meet scientists and astronauts, and enjoy live performances. Run through our Mars rover obstacle course, and learn how scientists search for life on other planets. Suit up and train like an astronaut while suspended in the air. Be a robot-or drive one. Build and launch rockets. And wire up your brain to use its electric signals to fly a helicopter or tune into a friend's brain. It's a day of science the family will never forget.

Alan Alda's Flame Challenge: What Is Sleep?
Participants: Mary Carskadon, Paul Shaw, Robert Stickgold, Matthew Wilson
Host: Alan Alda
May 31 at 1pm
NYU Skirball Center (566 LaGuardia Place)
$30 ($15 for students)
This year's iteration of Alan Alda's popular Flame Challenge contest, which asks scientists to explain a complex question to an 11-year-old, will ask, "What is sleep exactly, and how does it affect our brains?" Audiences will watch the brain activity of a wired-up person sleeping offstage, and learn what happens during different phases, including REM sleep, when most vivid dreams occur. They'll also see how sleeping rats' brains are still able to respond to audio cues. Finally, they'll learn how sleep deprivation harms fruit flies' tiny brains and big human brains-and why getting enough sleep is especially important to youngsters. Capping the program, Alan Alda will announce this year's Flame Challenge winners. Participants include Mary Carskadon, Paul Shaw, Robert Stickgold, and Matthew Wilson. The Flame Challenge is presented in association with the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University.

SALON: Caution: Robots at Work
Participants: Christof Koch, Seth Lloyd, Masoud Mohseni
May 31, 1-2:30pm
NYU Global Center, Grand Hall (238 Thompson Street, 5th Floor)
$25 ($15 for students)
The World Science Festival's annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival's premier public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and well-informed members of the general public.
Creating artificially intelligent machines may be the biggest event in human history. According to Stephen Hawking, "it might also be the last." And we're getting closer to that day. From Watson and Siri to the driverless car, machines are getting progressively smarter. The next step: creating truly intelligent machines that learn, not by being programmed for a task, but by trial and error. The potential benefits-and the potential risks-are enormous. With leaders in the fields of artificial intelligence, quantum engineer, and neuroscience, we'll probe the technical, economic, and philosophical impact of the AI revolution. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

Science and Storytime
Participants: Clayton Anderson, Artie Bennett, Deborah Heiligman, "Science Bob" Pflugfelder
May 31, 1-4pm
NYU Kimmel Center, Commuter Lounge (60 Washington Square S, Room 203)
FREE
Bring the kids for a special science book event just for them. New and favorite authors will share their stories. Shop our carefully curated collection of kids' science books for sale (at the NYU pop-up book shop open on Saturday and Sunday 10am - 6pm) and have your books signed by participating authors.

Time Is of the Essence...Or Is It?
Participants: David Z. Albert, Vijay Balasubramanian, Carlo Rovelli, Lee Smolin
Moderator: Jim Holt
May 31, 2-3:30pm
The Gerald W Lynch Theater at John Jay College (524 West 59th Street)
$35 ($20 for students)
What is time? The question has preoccupied philosophers and scientists for centuries. Isaac Newton described time as absolute, but Einstein proved that time is relative, and, shockingly, that time and space are intricately interwoven. Now recent work in string theory and quantum gravity suggests that space and time may not be fundamental. Much as matter is made of molecules and atoms, other, more exotic entities may be the constituents of space and time. What might those ingredients be? And if this approach proves correct, what new picture of reality will emerge? The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

SALON: Mind Controlled
Participants: Heather Berlin, Yarrow Dunham, Tamar Kushnir
May 31, 2015, 3:30-5pm
NYU Global Center, Grand Hall (238 Thompson Street, 5th Floor)
$25 ($15 for students)
The World Science Festival's annual salon series offers in-depth conversations with leading scientists, extending the discussion of the Festival's premier public programs to graduate students, postdocs, faculty, and well-informed members of the general public.
How much control do we have over our impulses and behavior? How much do environmental factors affect our actions? And when do children begin to develop a sense of free will? Join us for an eye-opening discussion on implicit bias, impulse control, and free will. From new fMRI research on how brain chemistry and behavior are affected by environmental factors, to current studies of children and when they develop biases, this conversation provides new insight on why and how and, to some extent, if we make our own decisions. The Big Ideas Series is supported in part by the John Templeton Foundation.

Here, There and Everywhere: The Next Quantum Leap
Participants: Artur Ekert, Daniel Gottesman, Seth Lloyd, Eleanor Rieffel
May 31 at 5pm
NYU Skirball Center (566 LaGuardia Place)
$35 ($20 for students)
Often viewed as "spooky" or downright bizarre, quantum theory is fueling a powerful new era of amazing technology. For the first time ever, quantum cryptography has created an "unbreakable code." In quantum teleportation, physicists are breaking new distance records each year. And in the world of computation, scientists are inching closer to that elusive breakthrough: the universal quantum computer. Today's top quantum physicists, including Artur Ekert of the University of Oxford, Daniel Gottesman, Seth Lloyd, and Eleanor Rieffel will discuss the information shake-up underway-and predict when we can expect a quantum computer of our own.

To Explain the World: A Conversation with Nobel Laureate Steven Weinberg
Participant: Steven Weinberg
Moderator: John Hockenberry
May 31 at 5:30pm
New-York Historical Society, Smith Auditorium (170 Central Park West at 77th Street)
$35 ($20 for students)
Audiences will hear a one-on-one conversation between John Hockenberry, host of public radio's "The Takeaway," and Steven Weinberg, whom many consider the world's foremost theoretical physicist. Weinberg has received countless accolades, including the Nobel Prize in Physics and the National Medal of Science, and election to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and Britain's Royal Society, as well as to the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

ABOUT THE WORLD SCIENCE FESTIVAL
The World Science Festival brings together great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that presents the wonders of science and the drama of scientific discovery to a broad general audience.

The Festival's flagship live event, launched in 2008, is an annual weeklong celebration and exploration of science. Through gripping debates, original theatrical works, interactive explorations, musical performances, intimate salons, and major outdoor experiences, the Festival takes science out of the laboratory and into the streets, parks, museums, galleries, and premier performing arts venues of New York City.

Hailed a "new cultural institution" by The New York Times, the Festival has featured scientific and cultural luminaries including Stephen Hawking, Maggie Gyllenhaal, E.O. Wilson, John Lithgow, Sir Paul Nurse, Glenn Close, Harold Varmus, Yo-Yo Ma, Steven Weinberg, Philip Glass, Eric Lander, Steven Chu, Chuck Close, Richard Leakey, Bobby McFerrin, Sylvia Earle, Anna Deavere Smith, Oliver Sacks, Liev Schreiber, Mary-Claire King, Charlie Kaufman, Bill T. Jones, John Hockenberry, and Elizabeth Vargas, among many others.

The annual Festivals have collectively drawn more than 1.3 million visitors since 2008, and millions more have viewed the programs online.

World Science U is the Foundation's online education arm where students and lifelong learners can dive more deeply through artfully produced digital education content presented by world-renowned scientists.

The World Science Festival is a production of the Science Festival Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization headquartered in New York City. The Foundation's mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future.

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