New health campaign against sugary drinks

August 31, 2009 3:53:29 PM PDT
It's hard to overeat without noticing it. But by contrast, soda and other sugar-sweetened beverages can sneak up on you, adding hundreds of calories to your diet each day without ever filling you up. In a new effort to highlight the health impact of sweetened drinks, the New York City Department of Health is asking a bold question: Are you pouring on the pounds?

The agency's new public-awareness campaign, which includes posters in the subway system and a multilingual health bulletin, began Monday and will run for three months.

The campaign's signature image, in which a bottle of soda, sports drink or sweetened iced tea turns to a blob of fat as it reaches the glass, is s a stark reminder of how these products can lead to obesity and related health problems. The ads urge New Yorkers to cut back on sugary beverages and quench their thirst with water, seltzer or low-fat milk instead. Many people may stir a teaspoon or two of sugar into their coffee, but few realize that a 20-ounce bottle of soda can contain 16 1/2 teaspoons of sugar.

"Sugary drinks shouldn't be a part of our everyday diet," New York City Health Commissioner Thomas Farley said. "Drinking beverages loaded with sugars increases the risk of obesity and associated problems, particularly diabetes but also heart disease, stroke, arthritis and cancer."

To read the full release, visit NYC.gov. CLICK HERE to read the full health bulletin.


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