PHOTOS: San Gennaro through the years

ByCristina Romano WABC logo
Sunday, September 17, 2017
All the color and gaiety, pomp and solemnity of an old Italian religious festival, or festa, came to the drab, narrow streets of New York's lower East Side, Sept. 24, 1956.
Democratic vice presidential candidate Walter Mondale pins money on the base of the statue of San Gennaro, Sunday, Sept. 19, 1976
Sen. Walter Mondale, democratic vice presidential candidate, reaches cut to shake hands as he is engulfed in crowd at the San Gennaro festival in Little Italy Sept. 19, 1976.
People crowd Mulberry Street in New York during the annual San Gennaro Feast in New York's Little Italy, Sept. 1979.  (AP Photo)
People stroll along Mulberry Street, decorated for the upcoming San Gennaro Feast in New York's Little Italy, Sept. 9, 1995.
Robert Diaz poses with a variety of cannoli while working for a vendor at the Feast of San Gennaro on Mulberry Street in New York's Little Italy neighborhood, Sept. 15, 2016
People stroll down checking out the offerings from food vendors Mulberry Street during the annual Feast of San Gennaro in New York's Little Italy neighborhood, Sept. 15, 2016
Crowds of people file file through a narrow corridor between food vendor and bars on Mulberry Street during the first day of the annual Feast of San Gennaro in Little Italy
Four year-old Abby Droge of San Diego, Calif., ponders what flavor of gelato she wants on Mulberry Street during the Feast of San Gennaro on Sept. 15, 2016
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PHOTOS: San Gennaro through the yearsAll the color and gaiety, pomp and solemnity of an old Italian religious festival, or festa, came to the drab, narrow streets of New York's lower East Side, Sept. 24, 1956.
AP

LITTLE ITALY, Manhattan (WABC) -- Take a look back at some photos of the Feast of San Gennaro!

The first feast in New York City took place on September 19th, 1926. Immigrants from Naples, Italy settled along Mulberry Street in Little Italy, and carried the traditions they had followed in Italy to honor the Patron Saint of Naples.

When the feast originally started it was a one-day street festival - now it is an 11 day event featuring cannoli, sausage and peppers, and other delicious Italian foods, along with a procession of the statue of San Gennaro and a celebratory mass at the Most Precious Blood Church on Mulberry Street.

If you haven't been to San Gennaro yet, you have plenty of time - it ends on Sunday, September 24th.

CLICK HERE for more on the history of San Gennaro.