MTA Traffic Mobility Review Board lays out different scenarios for congestion pricing fees

ByEyewitness News WABC logo
Monday, October 2, 2023
MTA review board lays out different scenarios for congestion pricing
The MTA's Traffic Mobility Review Board met Monday and laid out different scenarios for how they would charge drivers when the congestion pricing rules go into effect. Sonia Rincon has the details.

NEW YORK (WABC) -- The MTA's Traffic Mobility Review Board met Monday and laid out different scenarios for how they would charge drivers when the congestion pricing rules go into effect.

The board has not yet decided what the base toll will be for congestion pricing. It's still trying to minimize exemptions to keep that base toll as low as possible and still meet revenue goals.

However, the board laid out four different congestion pricing scenarios and all of them have several factors in common.

Here's what they agreed on so far:

  • Drivers entering the Central Business District, that's below 60th Street, via a tunnel will get some type of crossing credit.
  • Those would be the Queens Midtown Tunnel, the Battery Tunnel and the Lincoln and Holland tunnels. The East River bridges in that area would not get a credit because they don't have tolls so this would be sort of an equalizer on the East River to minimize people rerouting to avoid the tolls, and the George Washington Bridge wouldn't get a credit because it's not in the Central Business District.

  • The board has also agreed upon nighttime discounts for driving into the congestion pricing zone during off-peak hours.
  • Taxis and for-hire vehicles will get a per-ride surcharge.
  • Commuter buses will be exempted.
  • Specialized government vehicles will be exempted.
  • There will be discounts (50% after 10) for low-income commuters without transit access.
  • The board is expected to make a recommendation on a tolling structure this month before the new congestion pricing rules go into effect in May.

    Once in place, drivers will have to pay an extra toll if they enter Manhattan below 60th Street.

    Those toll prices could range from $9 to as much as $23.

    The plan is getting a lot of backlash from groups like rideshare drivers and commuters from outer boroughs and New Jersey.

    Rideshare passengers already pay a $2.75 congestion fee.

    New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy said New Jersey drivers who pay a toll at Port Authority crossings should be exempt from congestion pricing.

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