COVID News: CDC offers tips to stay safe during holiday season

COVID-19 Live Updates, News and Information
NEW YORK (WABC) -- The CDC is offering a list of recommendations it says will keep you and your family safe from COVID during the holiday season.

It says use window fans to keep air at indoor gatherings as fresh as possible.

If you have screen doors, use them -- anything to keep the air flowing through the house if you are hosting lots of people.

The agency says circulating air wards off airborne transmission of the virus or at least reduces its changes of spreading.

Click here for more tips.

Here are more of today's COVID-19 headlines:



Alaska allows hospitals to ration care amid COVID spike
Alaska on Saturday activated emergency crisis protocols that allow 20 medical facilities to ration care if needed as the state recorded the nation's worst COVID-19 diagnosis rates in recent days, straining the state's limited health care system.

The declaration covers three facilities that had already announced emergency protocols, including the state's largest hospital, Providence Alaska Medical Center in Anchorage. The state's declaration also includes the other two hospitals in Anchorage and facilities across the nation's largest but sparsely populated state.

Key dates for booster shots and vaccines for kids
The Food and Drug Administration has announced three important October dates regarding booster shots and COVID-19 vaccines for kids.

On October 14, an advisory panel will discuss Moderna's request for booster shots for people ages 18 and older.
The next day, on October 15, the panel will discuss whether those who got the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine need a booster. The panel will also consider whether Americans should mix and match vaccines.

And on October 26, the panel will discuss Pfizer's data on its vaccine for children ages 5 to 11.

Supreme Court justice denies injunction on NYC school vaccine mandate
The deadline has passed for unvaccinated New York City public school employees to get their first dose of the COVID-19 shot or face suspension and possible termination, after Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor declined to provide a last minute reprieve Friday. Sotomayor denied the request by a group of teachers for an emergency injunction. She did not issue any explanation or statement, and she did not refer the matter to the full court for a vote.
'Aladdin' cancels more Broadway performances due to COVID
Disney's "Aladdin" has once again canceled performances of the Broadway musical due to breakthrough COVID-19 cases, with the show announcing additional cases just one night after it reopened. The curtain finally rose at the hit show Tuesday after 18 months in the dark due to the pandemic, but Wednesday's performance was canceled after members of the company tested positive. The show resumed Thursday before the new cases Friday. As a result, all performances will be canceled for roughly the next two weeks.

US hits 700,000 COVID deaths just as cases begin to fall
The United States reached its latest heartbreaking pandemic milestone Friday, eclipsing 700,000 deaths from COVID-19 just as the surge from the delta variant is starting to slow down and give overwhelmed hospitals some relief. It took three and a half months for the U.S. to go from 600,000 to 700,000 deaths, driven by the variant's rampant spread through unvaccinated Americans. The death toll is larger than the population of Boston.

Broadway extends vaccine, mask mandates
The Broadway League announced Friday that the owners and operators of all 41 Broadway theatres in New York City will continue to require vaccinations for audience members, as well as performers, backstage crew, and theatre staff, for all performances through the end of the year. Masks will also be required for audiences inside the theatre, except while actively eating or drinking in designated locations. Under the policy, guests over the age of 12 will need to be fully vaccinated with an FDA or WHO authorized vaccine AND present a government-issued photo ID such as a driver's license or passport. (Guests 12-18 may use a government-issued ID or school ID - no photo required.).

MTA launches vaccine or testing plan, new hires must be fully vaccinated against COVID

The MTA announced Friday that all unvaccinated employees will be required to take weekly COVID-19 tests beginning Monday, October 4, and that all new hires must be fully vaccinated beginning on or after November 14. Vaccinations are available to employees at MTA facilities and other locations, and the MTA currently has 138 on-site locations for employees to get tested.
"The MTA is an industry leader in protecting the health and safety of transit workers," acting MTA Chair and CEO Janno Lieber said. "The science is clear. Vaccines are the best way to protect yourself, colleagues, relatives and neighbors from COVID-19."

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