Winter hurricane? What is a 'bomb cyclone' or 'bombogenesis'?

Bombogenesis happens when "a midlatitude cyclone rapidly intensifies, dropping at least 24 millibars over 24 hours."
PHILADELPHIA (WABC) -- New York, New Jersey and Connecticut are being blanketed with snow Saturday as a powerful storm moves up the coast and through the northeast.

The storm essentially has the intensity of a hurricane as it undergoes "bombogenesis." But what does that mean?

Bombogenesis happens when "a midlatitude cyclone rapidly intensifies, dropping at least 24 millibars over 24 hours."

RELATED | Snow totals: How much snow has fallen across the Tri-State area

This extreme and rapid change in pressure forms a very strong storm, a so-called "weather bomb" or "bomb cyclone."

"Bomb Cyclone" is not an official term, though. Meteorologists and scientists use bombogenesis.

Bombogenesis occurs most commonly off the East Coast, and the most common recipe for it to form is "cold air along the land, warm air over the water," according to AccuWeather.

RELATED | LIRR suspended Saturday, other mass transit info

The storm began late Friday and will continue in some part through Saturday afternoon and evening.

Strong winds are accompanying the storm, and coastal flooding in parts of the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast is a given.

For the latest update, including which parts of our region might see snow, check the latest AccuWeather forecast below.

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